Hygiene & infection prevention network

#7 Kelley Boston on quantifying the invisible (United States)

March 05, 2021 Sani nudge Clinical Advisory Team Season 2 Episode 7
Hygiene & infection prevention network
#7 Kelley Boston on quantifying the invisible (United States)
Chapters
0:46
Path to infection prevention
3:57
Responsibility to the public
5:33
Finding the reason behind an infection
7:54
The power of data in making a difference in IP
9:07
Preventing harm, somebody is safer for the work that you have done
13:19
Spending time as an Infection preventionist
15:51
Finding the positive in as much as possible
17:46
Coronavirus in Texas, USA
19:39
Quantifying the invisible
27:58
Biggest healthcare challenges in the future
30:28
Technology and automation
Hygiene & infection prevention network
#7 Kelley Boston on quantifying the invisible (United States)
Mar 05, 2021 Season 2 Episode 7
Sani nudge Clinical Advisory Team

On the podcast is Kelley Boston. 

Kelley is a Senior Associate with Infection Prevention & Management Associates.  She brings a background in public health and epidemiology to her infection prevention practice.  She holds a Masters of Public Health from The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston School of Public Health, and did her undergraduate work at The University of Texas at Austin.  She holds certifications in infection prevention and control (CIC), healthcare quality (CPHQ) and is recognized as a Fellow of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (FAPIC).   

Ms. Boston’s primary experience is in acute care, and has held leadership roles in multi-facility systems that have included both community hospitals and major academic teaching centers, and  specialized practice areas including pediatrics, transplant, and trauma.  She was honored as an APIC Hero of Infection Prevention in 2016 for her work in program integration and development within a large multi-facility healthcare system, leading to significant sustained improvement in infection outcomes. 

Ms. Boston is an active member of both the Society for Healthcare Epidemiologists of America (SHEA) and the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), where she has served as president and board member in multiple local chapters, and at the national level on the Communications Committee and APIC Text Editorial Panel.  She is currently the Editor of the APIC Text Online: APIC Text of Infection Control and Epidemiology.

A few key takeaways: 
On resource alignment

  • You got to look at the cost-benefit trade. If I do this audit, what do I have to take time away from? Nobody has enough time or enough staff. It is all about the resources. 

On working in Infection Prevention

  • You will never reach the end of your IP knowledge. And if you think you have, they will throw something like Coronavirus at you. 
  • Do not harm. Hospitals can be dangerous places. By the end of the day, someone is safer for the work you have done.

On workplace culture

  • How do we build a culture where we can help each other and create high performing teams? The importance of prevention (before the damage happens) – and the talk about why it is difficult to document successful prevention results. 

On our role as healthcare workers

  • At the end of the day, someone is safer for the work that you have done.
  • Hospitals should be safe places where people come to get the medical care that they need and go home better. 
  • You will never be finished with the job. 

On data

  • Generally, in the field about 40% looking at what happened, and 60% looking at what is happening and then all of the other daily tasks.
  • Ask yourself, what are we collecting and how are we going to take action on it? 

 Connect with us on Twitter: 

  • Dr. Marco Bo Hansen 
    • @marcobohansen
  • Kelley Boston
    • @epikelley
Show Notes Chapter Markers

On the podcast is Kelley Boston. 

Kelley is a Senior Associate with Infection Prevention & Management Associates.  She brings a background in public health and epidemiology to her infection prevention practice.  She holds a Masters of Public Health from The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston School of Public Health, and did her undergraduate work at The University of Texas at Austin.  She holds certifications in infection prevention and control (CIC), healthcare quality (CPHQ) and is recognized as a Fellow of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (FAPIC).   

Ms. Boston’s primary experience is in acute care, and has held leadership roles in multi-facility systems that have included both community hospitals and major academic teaching centers, and  specialized practice areas including pediatrics, transplant, and trauma.  She was honored as an APIC Hero of Infection Prevention in 2016 for her work in program integration and development within a large multi-facility healthcare system, leading to significant sustained improvement in infection outcomes. 

Ms. Boston is an active member of both the Society for Healthcare Epidemiologists of America (SHEA) and the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), where she has served as president and board member in multiple local chapters, and at the national level on the Communications Committee and APIC Text Editorial Panel.  She is currently the Editor of the APIC Text Online: APIC Text of Infection Control and Epidemiology.

A few key takeaways: 
On resource alignment

  • You got to look at the cost-benefit trade. If I do this audit, what do I have to take time away from? Nobody has enough time or enough staff. It is all about the resources. 

On working in Infection Prevention

  • You will never reach the end of your IP knowledge. And if you think you have, they will throw something like Coronavirus at you. 
  • Do not harm. Hospitals can be dangerous places. By the end of the day, someone is safer for the work you have done.

On workplace culture

  • How do we build a culture where we can help each other and create high performing teams? The importance of prevention (before the damage happens) – and the talk about why it is difficult to document successful prevention results. 

On our role as healthcare workers

  • At the end of the day, someone is safer for the work that you have done.
  • Hospitals should be safe places where people come to get the medical care that they need and go home better. 
  • You will never be finished with the job. 

On data

  • Generally, in the field about 40% looking at what happened, and 60% looking at what is happening and then all of the other daily tasks.
  • Ask yourself, what are we collecting and how are we going to take action on it? 

 Connect with us on Twitter: 

  • Dr. Marco Bo Hansen 
    • @marcobohansen
  • Kelley Boston
    • @epikelley
Path to infection prevention
Responsibility to the public
Finding the reason behind an infection
The power of data in making a difference in IP
Preventing harm, somebody is safer for the work that you have done
Spending time as an Infection preventionist
Finding the positive in as much as possible
Coronavirus in Texas, USA
Quantifying the invisible
Biggest healthcare challenges in the future
Technology and automation